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Getting Grizzly – Devlin of ETERNALLY BAD

by moxielicious

IMG_3922We’re asking the cast 7 questions about ETERNALLY BAD. Serious or silly, here are ETERNALLY BAD cast member, Devlin’s answers.

Who is your favorite character in the show?

Grizzly Woman

What’s the strangest thing you learned in your research for the show?

How violent these gals were.

If we had stayed a matriarchal culture, what do you think would be the biggest difference in our society?

We would care more about our actions and the people around us.

If you were going to sleep with any character in the show… who would you choose?

Poa

You change character a lot, what’s your most challenging transformation?

Amaterasu

Has it been hard to keep a straight face on rehearsal?

Sometimes!! 

Ladies,  what has it meant to you to spend time reclaiming some bad girl legends?

Rejuvenated!

See Devlin and the rest of the cast as they “get bad” in ETERNALLY BAD at MOXIE Jul 10 – Aug 2, 2015. Tickets available at http://www.moxietheatre.com/eternallybad

“These bad #$@#%es are teaching me to really embrace my feminine side.” – Rae K. Hendersen of ETERNALLY BAD

by moxielicious

We’re asking the cast 7 questions about ETERNALLY BAD. Serious or silly, here are ETERNALLY BAD cast member, Rae K. Hendersen’s answers.

headshot_hendersonWho is your favorite character in the show?

Isis. Or the French thief in the Kannaki story. 

What’s the strangest thing you learned in your research for the show?

Well, this isn’t exactly strange, but I’ve always been fascinated by the way cultures and religions become absorbed by others over hundreds and thousands of years, and the same mythologies are retold again and again. Inanna, one of the earliest recorded gods, became Ishtar when the Babylonians came to power, and she shows up again as Isis, and so on. Another excellent example of this are all those dudes throughout ancient religions descending into the underworld and then resurrecting in the spring… a story we’re still retelling today. 

If we had stayed a matriarchal culture, what do you think would be the biggest difference in our society?

Rape culture would be wildly less pervasive, if not completely nonexistent. When society sees women as people with power and agency over themselves, the concept of them as objects or decoration cannot exist

If you were going to sleep with any character in the show… who would you choose?

Circe. Wait, is it weird to choose one of your own characters? Artemis. 

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Photo by Daren Scott

You change character a lot, what’s your most challenging transformation?

Right now, double dressing kimonos for Uzume, taking them off, and immediately putting them back on is taking years off of my life, what with all the sashes and sleeves and a million different places your arm could get tangled up. But we’re getting  it! The costumer is amazing about rigging the pieces for quick changes. 

Was it hard to keep a straight face in rehearsal?

Yes. I just cannot handle the entire Hawaii section. Everyone is killing me

What has it meant to you to spend time reclaiming some bad girl legends? 

I’ve been fascinated with ancient mythology since about age 11, so it’s been a blast getting to get some of these ladies that I’ve read about up on their feet. Their antics are bizarre and fantastical, like all classic fairy tales – but, unlike classic fairy tales, their stories aren’t morality tales about the importance of virginity and obedience. Performance-wise, it’s been very liberating for me. I’ve definitely stepped far outside my comfort zone, but in a good way. These characters are all so comfortable and confident in the sexual femininity of their bodies and their power over men – and as a fairly masculine-of-center lesbian, I’ve really had to work to get acquainted with that part of myself. It definitely started out feeling like I was performing in drag, but I’m feeling more confident in it now. So… That’s been different. But good. I guess what I’m saying is, these bad bitches are teaching me how to really embrace my feminine side.

See Rae K. Hendersen and the rest of the cast as they “get bad” in ETERNALLY BAD at MOXIE Jul 10 – Aug 2, 2015. Tickets available athttp://www.moxietheatre.com/eternallybad

Getting Bad with the Ladies – Michael Parrott of ETERNALLY BAD

by moxielicious

We’re asking the cast 7 questions about ETERNALLY BAD. Serious or silly, here are ETERNALLY BAD cast member, Michael Parrott’s answers.

 Michael_ParrottWho is your favorite character in the show? 

Probably the thief in the Kannaki scene. Completely ridiculous and makes Rae (fellow E-Bad cast member) nearly break

 What’s the strangest thing you learned in your research for the show?

Just the vast amount of mythos associated with each culture. I had always associated the idea of goddesses purely with Greek mythology and there is just so much more out there.

If we had stayed a matriarchal culture, what do you think would be the biggest difference in our society? 

Gender inclusion in governmental positions. 

If you were going to sleep with any character in the show… who would you choose? 

Lilith. Girl knows how to party

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Photo by Daren Scott

You change character a lot, what’s your most challenging transformation? 

Going from Lohiau into Ra. Quite a difficult quick change.

Has it been hard to keep a straight face on rehearsal? 

Oh absolutely. There are some hilarious moments in this show with some very talented/funny people; it’s a challenge to not break almost every night. 

How do you think, if these myths and legends were still known and shared by the average person, men and women might be different,  if at all?

I believe a lot of the goddesses that the women portray in the show are very strong and empowering individuals. I could see shedding more light on these stories possibly continuing those traits. 

See Michael Parrott and the rest of the cast as they “get bad” in ETERNALLY BAD at MOXIE Jul 10 – Aug 2, 2015. Tickets available athttp://www.moxietheatre.com/eternallybad

Getting Her Goddess On – Melissa Fernandes of ETERNALLY BAD

by moxielicious

We’re asking the cast 7 questions about ETERNALLY BAD. Serious or silly, here are their answers.

cd903f3a121ff53a8177e46297af9135Who is your favorite character in ETERNALLY BAD?

That is tough, I have grown pretty fond of all these characters. I would say my favorite to perform is probably Pele, because the characterizations we have come up with amuses me to no end and the song is very retro. I love these women because they use their wits, they make change through civil disobedience, and were the game changers of their time. It can be inspiring. 

What’s the strangest thing you learned in your research for ETERNALLY BAD?

I don’t think anything was really odd to me as I came onboard pretty familiar with these goddesses and the myths. I have a background with Wicca and so I am very familiar with the Triple Goddess.  I do love the correlations between modern-day fairy tales, for example with the Navajo story about Grizzly Woman. I also particularly love the strength they display. I feel like there was a great respect and reverence towards women in these cultures that is really lacking in today’s society. They were truly equals in many of these stories. We are still fighting for that today.

If we had stayed a matriarchal culture, like many that are referenced in ETERNALLY BAD, what do you think would be the biggest difference in our society?

Well, women tend to be more nurturing. It doesn’t mean we don’t have tempers or a competitive edge, but we would deal with violence differently. We relate to others in a more personal way; less posturing, more consensus. 

LilithIf you were going to sleep with any character in the show… who would you choose?

Lilith-She seems…um… fun. ;)

You change character a lot, what’s your most challenging transformation?

In terms of costume changes, I have it pretty easy, compared to everyone else but in terms of characterization, switching back and forth between Earth Mother and the other goddesses is a challenge. Sometimes we have literally one word to switch, so you have to be constantly thinking ahead while also, staying in the moment. Always a challenge for an actor and something that comes with the job, but it is lightning fast in this show.

Has it been hard to keep a straight face on rehearsal?

Yes! We also have to be careful about joking around too much because Javier WILL add it to the show and then you find yourself revisiting 80’s dance moves and juggling.

What has it meant to you to spend time reclaiming some bad girl legends?

It has been a great reminder to find your strength, be brave, and don’t take any shit from anyone. It has been nice to embrace a wild, sexy, strong side. We don’t get a lot of opportunity to experience that in reality without being depicted as bitchy, emasculating or domineering.

See Melissa Fernandes and the rest of the cast as they “get bad” in ETERNALLY BAD at MOXIE Jul 10 – Aug 2, 2015. Tickets available at http://www.moxietheatre.com/eternallybad

Embrace and Celebrate Your “Sore Thumb” – An Interview with Paul Araujo of LESSON 443

by moxielicious

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Paul Araujo and Daniela Millan in LESSON 443 at MOXIE

When Paul Araujo’s character in Tatiana Suarez Pico’s LESSON 443, Manny, threatens to set everyone at his daughter’s school straight, she tells him it doesn’t matter. She sticks out like a sore thumb. The offending “thumb” is her accent. She’s ashamed of what makes her different. Manny doesn’t argue, not at first, he knows what sore means. He’s got his own pain and secrets. The deeply troubled and loving character of Manny has won over audiences and critics and that has a lot to do with Paul Araujo’s nuanced approach to the part in MOXIE Theatre’s production of LESSON 443. He shared his process and a lot about himself.

What attracted you to LESSON 443?

A great script with lots of depth and universal themes that can influence and be of impact to a wide variety of people.  Also a script, a story and character that I knew would be a great challenge and would benefit me as an actor and person.  Finally, working with an award winning Theatre company and a vibrant and talented cast and director!

What has been your greatest challenge in playing Manny?

 Coming across as stern and strict while being a loving and caring father and being very specific with everything I say and do. I’m not a father, but Dani made it easy by always being present and staying in the moment.  Also, revisiting old wounds and being reminded of my own past mistakes and guilt.  Lastly, by making sacrifices in my own life to be able to participate in this production and being in a mind frame that I can do whatever I set myself to do.

Manny is a father who cares deeply for his daughter. Are there relationships in your life that helped you prepare for your on stage relationship with Cari played by Daniela Millan?

I relied on the script by writing down everything others in the play, the playwright and my own character say about myself — lots of character analysis and questioning.  Thinking about my character constantly has also been helpful for my preparation.  Lastly, I thought of my own father (even feeling like I sounded like him at times) and my brother, who is a father of 2 girls and 2 boys.

Whether people reading this have seen LESSON 443 or are about to see it before it closes Sunday, it will come as a surprise for them to learn that you’re an amputee. You’re also an advocate for people working with disabilities. Would you share with our readers how, if at all, your disability has been a challenge in your career? What would you say to other actors with a disability who are considering embarking on a professional career?

My disability has definitely been a challenge as an actor and person.  As actors, our bodies are our instrument, which can affect the acting if there is pain or self-consciousness.  I have learned to refocus my energy by thinking of the good things about myself and by embracing my disability and not letting it stop me from doing what I love to do.  Theatre has been very therapeutic!  And to other people with disabilities: embrace and celebrate your differences — we are all unique and that’s what makes the world an beautiful and interesting place!

Paul is also a musician, a member of the Amigos Del Rep and an advocate for people working with disabilities at Goodwill Industries. Catch Paul in LESSON 443 before it closes Sunday May 24th at MOXIE. Tickets available at http://www.moxietheatre.com/lessson443 or call 858-598-7620

Sisters with Herself – Wendy Waddell on Playing Twins in LESSON 443

by moxielicious

Wendy2

Daniela Millan and Wendy Waddell Photo by J.T. MacMillan

Wendy

Paul Araujo and Wendy Waddell Photo by Conor Mulligan

This isn’t Wendy Waddell’s first “dance” at MOXIE Theatre. She’s been working with MOXIE since our early days. Her role in LESSON 443, however, is a first of sorts. Waddell plays half the roles in the play, including one living character and one ghost who just happen to be twins. Waddell took time to discuss the unique experience of playing Maggie and Lottie in LESSON 443 by Tatiana Suarez-Pico, playing now through May 24, 2015 at MOXIE Theatre.

So, twins? That has to be a unique acting experience. Have you found it challenging?

The biggest challenge is trying to make each character their own. Lottie and Maggie are very different women, and I’ve been attempting to show those differences. I’m using different registers of my voice for each, the way they move, stand, do their hair, interact with Cari and Manny. It’s tricky, but I find that I’m able to feel the changes between the two each time I come on stage. I’m also trying to steer clear of any stereotypes with these particular women. And it’s taking me out of my comfort zone because I’m being very conscious of all my “go-to” facial expressions and body movements and trying not to rely on them.

The sisters are different from each other but do you have anything in common with either of them?

I can definitely relate to Maggie since I’m the mother of a young girl. Granted, my daughter is still only 4 and Cari is 14, but I feel the rapport between those two characters is extremely similar to the one I have with my own daughter.  It’s playful, loving, honest, critical and at times, painful. The “Mama Bear” that comes out in Maggie definitely resonates with me as well. I want to protect my daughter at all costs, but I also want her to fend for herself. It’s a tightrope I walk daily. With Lottie, I can relate to her flirtatious nature, since I’m that way myself. She also turns and runs from confrontation. I don’t necessarily do that, but I can relate to her wanting to put the past behind her and move on. I actually think that’s one of the more healthy attributes of Lottie. She tries not to dwell in the past. I’m learning to be better about that.

Will you tell us about playing a ghost?

Truth be told, I actually forget that Maggie is a ghost sometimes. She’s real to me. I love her and care about her and want her to be heard in this play, so I’m not trying to do anything “ghostly” with her. She’s also very real to Cari, and I live within her mind and confines, so if Cari doesn’t see her as a ghost, then I can’t be that way.

You mentioned being a mother. How has that real life experience affected your performance?

 As a mother, I find that I play a mom a lot more now. And when I do, it hits home in a way it never did prior to the birth of my own daughter. I usually wind up falling in love with the actors who play my child, and Dani (Daniela Millan) is no exception. She’s embodied Cari so completely and truthfully, that I feel like a mom to her, onstage and off. The reality that we are mortal and “you never have enough time with the people you love,” resonates so keenly with me. Every night, I get choked up at the end. It’s real to me. It’s painful, it’s freeing, it’s that mother/daughter bond that is indescribable. My love for my own daughter feeds into the love I feel towards Dani.

There are several “lessons” in LESSON 443. What do YOU hope the audience will take away with them?

I hope audiences walk away with some laughter and tears. I hope they are reminded to be good to each other.  I hope they are reminded of how we are all connected and how the actions of one affects many. And I hope they recognize the love that exists in this world we’ve created.

Catch Waddell as both Lottie and Maggie in LESSON 443 at MOXIE Theatre. Playing now – May 24, 2015. Tickets available at www.moxietheatre.com/lesson443 or call 858-598-7620

On Going Pro at 16 – An Interview with Actress Daniela Millan

by moxielicious

DSC_0024_editDaniela “Dani” Millan is 16. She really wants a Kawasaki Ninja zx-14r…in white. For those of you who, like myself,  know nothing about motorcycles, that’s a sport bike. A really fast one. That’s one of the first things MOXIE learned about Dani, aside from the fact that she is an actress. A really talented one. During a series of auditions for MOXIE’s next production, LESSON 443 by Tatiana Suarez-Pico, director Jennifer Eve Thorn knew she’d struck gold during Dani’s audition.

“We’d been searching high and low for an actress young enough to pass for 14, the age of the leading role in LESSON 443, but mature enough to handle the play. She needed to be bilingual, handle a dialect and be pretty fearless,” Thorn said. “I could tell by the way Dani handled her audition, that she had something special.”

Dani attends the San Diego School for Creative and Performing Arts where MOXIE has had great success finding young actors in the past (Jada Temple and Deja Fields from CRUMBS FROM THE TABLE OF JOY). Like her character in LESSON 443, Dani wasn’t born in the US, although she was raised here. She’s Colombian American and loves returning to Colombia to visit her family (especially when that involves riding motorcycles with her cousins.) She dances with Hispanic Art Theatre, studied at the Old Globe Theatre’s Summer Shakespeare Intensive program, practices mixed martial arts and speaks 3 languages, including Korean which she decided to begin teaching herself. Did we mention she’s talented?

In LESSON 443, Dani plays the rebellious and determined Carynne “Cari” Gonzalez. A punk 14 year old on the verge of her 15th birthday who speaks to the ghost of her mother who died when she was a baby. Cari is Mexican American and speaks with an accent, which she despises. Dani has had to learn an accent for the role but that has been less nerve wracking than taking on her first love scene. LESSON 443 contains an awkward, yet charming, teenage “first time” love scene.

“The actors are fully clothed and it’s fairly tame,” said director Jennifer Eve Thorn, “but it IS a real love scene and for both my teenage actors in the cast, it’ll be their first real one on stage. The fact that these teenagers are making big life decisions, whether they are right or wrong, is part of what drew me to the play as a director.”

When asked how her parents felt about it, Dani said

“My mother knows me. She knows my limits and she knows this is what I want to do, so she’s supporting me.”

To which we replied,

“What about your dad?”

“Well…he….well…he knows my mom said I could do it so…he’s supporting me too.”

Moxie-postcard-Lesson_0215-FRONTHa. Enough said. Daniela Millan may be her father’s little girl, but at MOXIE starting April 30th, she begins her professional career as one incredibly mature and talented young woman in a breakout leading role. Don’t miss her.

Tickets on sale now for LESSON 443 playing at MOXIE April 30-May 24, 2015 at www.moxieatheatre.com/lesson443 or call 858-598-7620

The Engineer Behind the Mask

by moxielicious

DanaB_unmasked

Dana Byrne in JADE HEART. Photo by Daren Scott

A single mask has a thousand faces and the mask that actress Dana Byrne wears in MOXIE Theatre’s San Diego premiere of JADE HEART, playing now through August 10, 2014,  is no exception. The truth is that the actress gives the mask its faces and Dana Byrne has certainly filled the mask she wears as the character “China Mom.”  Dana also plays several other wonderful characters in JADE HEART, including the charming and wise Mu Chang. San Diego audiences may have seen her in the San Diego Choraleers’ Musical Concert Bye Bye Birdie as Kim in May and June 2014, but to many of our audiences she’s a new talent in San Diego. She took a moment between performances to let the MOXIE Blog interview her.

When did you first begin acting?

I loved acting since I was a young girl and was a pretty successful singer and dancer when I was a teenager. After that, due to culture and family influence, I did not continue acting, instead, I was perusing a career as an engineer.  After two of my children grew up, I returned to my beloved acting about 2 years ago.

How has the process been working on JADE HEART?

Delicia is a wonderful director, and it is a  joy when I feel I have made her directions into my real actions.  I am so happy to work with the talented cast and they are my inspirations. I am grateful that Jo Anne spent a lot of time helping with my diction, and when I hear my improved voice, it is full of joy. Having been working at Moxie Theatre will always be in my happiest memories.

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Dana Wing Lau and Dana Byrne in JADE HEART. Photo by Daren Scott

The under-representation of Asia-Americans on stage is something that has been coming more into focus in the public eye over last few years. Obviously for you, it’s an issue you were already aware of. How has working on JADE HEART been in light of those challenges you face as an Asian-American actress?

I appreciate that Will writes this wonderful play that displays Chinese culture, politics, and history. I appreciate that Moxie Theatre embraces this play by using Asian actors to tell the stories.  Asian actors had been under-represented for years and we are not generally considered for many plays. So this production means a lot.

What do you think audiences will enjoy most about JADE HEART?

I think Jade Heart tells a unique story in unique ways. It is a dramatic play with humor. One of my friends said she cried during the play because she felt pain and sorrow for Jade and her two moms and, at the same time, it was a beautiful Sunday afternoon and the humor in the play made her laugh.

Some people love the non-linear style of the play. One of my friends said the style of Jade Heart provides opportunities for the audience to think or guess what will happen next, and they continue to think when the play has ended.  

JADE HEART is playing now – August 10, 2014 at MOXIE Theatre. Tickets available at http://www.moxietheatre.com/jadeheart or call 858-598-7620

THAT was Jo Anne Glover?

by moxielicious

JoAnneGlover

Jo Anne Glover in “Mud Blue Sky” Promo Photo Shoot – by Daren Scott

Standing in the lobby after a performance of MOXIE’s Mud Blue Sky by Marisa Wegrzyn, I overheard a long time patron say “They were all so good. Who was the blonde?” To which the house manager replied, “That was Jo Anne Glover, you know Jo Anne, she’s one of the founders of MOXIE.” The patron hesitated, “Well, of course I know Jo Anne, but…wait THAT was Jo Anne Glover?” It’s not  surprising that she was mistaken. Glover did grow six inches for the part, go blonde, construct a new strut and virtually reinvent herself as the sharp-tongued, single-minded and fairly selfish, “Sam”,  in Mud Blue Sky (see the image below). Here’s where you ask how she GREW. We can’t explain it but we promise you’ll agree that Sam is taller than the actress who plays her and it’s not the shoes.

Glover fans will tell you that transforming isn’t a new trick for the actress who works all over the city but this transformation is perhaps one of her most complete to date and it’s utterly convincing. 

“Moxie co-founder Jo Anne Glover gives a razor-edge performance as the manipulative and self-absorbed Sam.” -UT San Diego 

 

“Glover’s Sam is utterly convincing in her struggle to succeed in the dual worlds of motherhood and work.  She’s up for anything (and is randy to boot), and the internal fight is evident and riveting to watch” – San Diego Gay and Lesbian News (sdgln.com)

 

“Speaking of timing, Jo Anne Glover’s Sam is right on the button with hers. Both awed and amazed all at once her expressions are priceless..”-examiner.com

 

Glover took time before a performance to tell us about her experience in Mud Blue Sky and also took time to record a fabulous video interview about the character and play. Enjoy both and reserve your tickets for one of the two remaining performances of Mud Blue Sky on Saturday June 7 or Sunday June 8th! Click Here to Buy Tickets Now or call 858-598-7620

 

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Jo Anne Glover as Sam in Mud Blue Sky – Photo by Ash Arrow Photography

What shows have you done recently in San Diego that MOXIE audiences may have seen you in? 

Maple & Vine at Cygnet, Skinless at MOXIE.

How are you like your character in Mud Blue Sky? How are you different? 

I actually think she’s the most different from me than any character I’ve played in a while. She likes to party and talks a lot (I mean, I might talk a lot, but not as fast or as broadly as her).  She’s definitely an “acter”
not a thinker.

What have you learned during the rehearsal and production process for Mud Blue Sky?

I think I’ve learned a bit more about “just doing it” – allowing myself to say and do things I’d never personally do or say with abandon.

What is the hardest moment in the show for you to not break character and laugh? 

 If I say it’d ruin the surprise.

What made you want to be a part of this production? 

The script and the company involved.

What is most surprising to you about this play?  

The way it creeps into your heart and leaves you smiling.

 

It Takes a Strong Woman to Play Fragile

by moxielicious

MelissaFernandes

Melissa Fernandes in promotional photo shoot for Mud Blue Sky. Photo by Daren Scott

We can’t get enough of Melissa Fernandes. Who can? One of San Diego’s most loved actresses, Fernandes is known for bringing depth and humanity to every role she plays. Her loving portrayal of Angie, the recently fired, divorced and haunted, yet painfully cheerful, flight attendant in MOXIE’s Mud Blue Sky, is no exception.

“Melissa Fernandes is fragile and tender as Angie” –UT San Diego

 

“Fernandes hides some deep sadness behind those eyes of Angie and at one point, delivers a heart-wrenching monologue that every actress of a certain age should be memorizing for their next audition. If you can come 50% close to what she delivered on stage, you’d be in the running for a call back.” -thedailyactor.com

 

“Fernandes makes it impossible not to empathize and wish Angie Well.” – San Diego Gay and Lesbian News

We caught up with her between performances to learn more one the most sought after talents in our thriving theatre community.

What would MOXIE audiences have seen you in recently in San Diego?  

Last year, I performed in Assassins, Company and A Christmas Carol at Cygnet Theatre. Next up is The Full Monty at New Village Arts.

How are you like your character, Angie,  in Mud Blue Sky? How are you different?

How am I like Angie? Well, I am awkward socially that is for sure! But I also have spent most of my life dealing with body image and physical standards that are almost too high to meet. It is a daily struggle for me. I knew taking this role would be uncomfortable for me because of how Angie is described. It is not easy hearing your character called fat every night. But, I think she proves to be much more than that- funny, flawed, human and very real. I love that about her. 

How am I different? Lots of ways, but you will have to come see the show to find out. 

Have you learned anything new during this rehearsal and production process?

I have loved, loved, loved working with Jen, Jo Anne, DeAnna and Tyler. I have learned so much just by watching them and watching them evolve with their characters. I try to make my mantra “Be Brave” whenever I go into rehearsal for a show. They made it very easy to be brave. Even when it was hard for me. 

What is the hardest moment in the show for you to not break character and laugh?

Lucky for me, the parts I find funniest, I am back stage so I get to laugh my ass off as much as I want. 

What made you want to be a part of this production?

I have been wanting to work with Moxie again for literally years now, ever since I last appeared in Drink Me. I love this group of artists and admire them so much. It is an amazing gift to be able to surround yourself with strong, confident, talented women. I didn’t care what I was doing, I just wanted to come back to Moxie. I am very grateful to this team. 

What is most surprising to you about this play?

The most surprising thing about this play for me, is the depth of the characters. It is very funny, but beyond that, it is heartfelt and very human. The need for human connection in our lives plays such a huge part in this show. It could be a very superficial comedy, but all of these characters have so much heart and some level of pain, it makes them all very complex and deceptively difficult to play. It is a real challenge. 

Don’t miss your chance to see Fernandes in MOXIE’s Mud Blue Sky playing now June 8, 2014. Tickets available at www.moxietheatre.com/mudbluesky or call 858-598-7620

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